Singapore Noodles

While the sizable ingredient list made me think that these Singapore Noodles would be delicious and flavor-filled, the end result lacked the expected punch of flavor.  Because there is no sauce and I only bought 1 extra lime, it meant that I was left with a boring meal after my lone lime was used up. Upon closer examination of the ingredients; shrimp, bean sprouts, rice noodles, etc., the meal relies on a bell pepper and two tablespoons of bloomed curry powder for its flavor. Be sure to include the optional cayenne for any hope of flavor. The recipe is by no means bad, but doesn’t justify the nearly $20 price tag; 3-1/2 stars. 3-stars after I ran out of lime.

Good, but lacked flavor

Good, but lacked flavor

Comments:

  1. You will need 2 limes for serving as wedges. Otherwise the blandness owing to the lack of sauce will make you wish you cooked something else.
  2. Chris Kimball mentions that there are two types of curry powder; “sweet” and Madras. While he doesn’t recommend one type or the other, I can tell you that the regular “sweet” curry powder was insufficient to impart much flavor. If I had the choice I’d go with the Madras, but don’t think it’s worth buying another bottle to add to my already-full spice cabinet.
  3. Rice noodles not in Asian section of my supermarket, but rather gluten-free section. There was no rice vermicelli, so I bought the rice noodles that seemed closest.

Rating: 3-1/2 stars.
Cost: $19
How much work? Medium.
How big of a mess?  Medium.
Start time: 4:00. Dinner time: 5:00

Chris Kimball’s original recipe is here. The descriptions of how I prepared it today are given below:

4 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
2 tablespoons curry powder
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
6 ounces rice vermicelli
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
12 ounces large shrimp (26 to 30 per pound),
4 large eggs
Salt
3 garlic cloves, minced to paste
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 red bell pepper
2 large shallots, sliced thin
2/3 cup chicken broth
4 ounces (2 cups) bean sprouts
4 scallions, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
3 limes, 2 teaspoons lime juice, plus 2 limes for serving wedges

  1. If shrimp is frozen, defrost in cold water. Prepare the shrimp by peeling and deveining. Remove the tail and cut into 1/2” pieces.
  2. Boil 1-1/2 quarts of water to a boil. Add 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, 2 tablespoons curry and 1/8 teaspoon cayenne to a 23” non-stick skillet. Set over medium-low burner and cook for 4 minutes until becomes fragrant; stir occasionally.  Remove skillet from burner and set aside.
  3. Put noodles into a large bowl, and pour boiling water over noodles and briefly stir. Allow noodles to soak for 2-1/2 minutes until flexible, but still not soft; stir half way through soaking.
  4. Drain noodles and empty onto a cutting board and cut into thirds. Return noodles to the empty bowl. Add curry oil, 2 tablespoons soy sauce, and 1 teaspoon sugar. Combine by tossing together using tongs. Set bowl aside.  Add 4 large eggs to small bowl and beat lightly.
  5. Minced garlic and ginger, and set aside together. Remove stem and seeds from bell pepper and cut into 2″ long match sticks. Thinly slice your shallot.
  6. Use paper towels to wipe out skillet and add 2 TEAspoons oil. Put over medium-high burner and pre-heat until the oil begins to shimmer.  Add cut shrimp pieces to skillet. Cook for about 90 seconds without moving to brown the bottoms. Stir shrimp and continue to cook for another 90 seconds.
  7. Push to one half of the skillet. Add 1 teaspoon oil to cleared side of skillet, and add the beaten eggs into the empty  side of the skillet. Sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cook for 1 minutes until the eggs set, but remain wet; stirring eggs lightly.  Stir shrimp together with the eggs and continue to cook for 30 seconds more until the eggs are fully cooked. Empty shrimp-egg mixture to second large bowl.
  8. Turn down burner to medium. Add 1 teaspoon oil into the empty skillet and pre-heat until the oil begins to shimmer. Add minced garlic and ginger and cook, and saute for 15 seconds. Add bell pepper and shallots and cook for 2 minutes; stir frequently. Empty to bowl with shrimp.
  9. Turn burner up to medium-high. Add 2/3 cup chicken broth and bring up to a simmer. Add soaked noodles and cook for 2 minutes until all the liquid has been absorbed; stir often. Add noodles to bowl with shrimp/vegetables. Combine.
  10. Add bean sprouts, scallions, and lime juice, and toss until combined. Serve on a warmed platter and serve passing 2 limes worth of wedges separately.

 

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6 Responses to Singapore Noodles

  1. Jonny Rashid says:

    Sounds similar to your experience with the Chinese braised beef. A coincidence? Does Chris Kimball underspice his Asian recipes? He is known for not liking spicy food.

  2. Hugh says:

    I dont think Chris eats in really good asian restaurants in Vermont or Mass. Penzey’s has an awesome Singapore spice blend that I highly recommend. I fell in love with Mei Fun (Singapore Rice Noodles) in college, and it took a long time for me to find the right sauce/marinade recipe. This recipe wouldn’t be so bad with some extra spice, and some nuoc mam replacing a tablespoon of the soy. I would try a cheaper version try marinating boneless chicken thighs in some of the ingredients to replace of 1/2 the shrimp. Oh and I always add some of the Penzey’s freeze dried shallots to my asian cooking, helps alot! Also some thuong ot toi to replace the cayenne. I try to do lower sodium since I’m about to hit 50, and the spice house and other websites have been a big help. Happy Cooking, love your posts!

  3. trialbyflour says:

    We had the same reaction to the Singapore Noodle recipe. Ok, a lot of steps, too dry.
    On the other hand, the burger recipe in that issue is awesome.

  4. Homecook says:

    I agree. I’ve tried several recipes for Singapore Noodles and this doesn’t even come close. I actually missed the curry oil that they were so pleased to have eliminated. There would be no need to cut the noodles in order to eliminate the gloppy mess if the sauce was authentic. Flavor was completely off. So was the texture. Thanks, anonomous for your recipe. I will try it next.

  5. Carol F says:

    I made this recipe tonight. I agree with the others. It is dry and I will look for another recipe before making it again.

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